Accessing this content is a benefit of AAGL Membership
To continue, please log into your AAGL membership account:

AAGL Username

Password

LOGIN
CANCEL

Click on the poster above to navigate to the next slide
 

سكس مترجم

سكس

سكس مصري

brie larson nude

bestincestporn

COVID-19: Joint Statement on Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

Joint Statement on Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery During the COVID-19 Pandemic 


Issued:  3/27/2020 – by AAGL | SPANISH | PORTUGUESE

The surgical care of gynecologic patients during the COVID-19 pandemic presents numerous challenges regarding not only patient and community safety, but that of the physicians and operating room personnel. Guidance around minimally invasive gynecologic surgery is a rapidly evolving topic, and the information presented below is subject to change as new data becomes available.

Urgency of Surgical Treatment:

The AAGL, along with many other surgical and women’s health professional societies, supports suspension of non-essential surgical care during the immediate phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. Please refer to AAGL’s Joint statement on elective surgeries dated March 16, 2020 (1).

Additionally, depending on the degree of urgency, COVID-19 positive patients may be best-served by delaying surgical procedures until their infection is resolved. However, in some instances, gynecologic surgical care may be deemed essential and unable to be delayed. We have outlined important safety information to consider when performing gynecologic surgery during this time.

Universal Evaluation:

The COVID-19 status of every patient should be evaluated by pre-operative screening on the day of surgery including history, physical exam and patient questionnaire regarding flu-related symptoms (see Appendix 1) and exposures. When possible,

COVID-19 testing should be undertaken for symptomatic and at-risk patients prior to surgery. As testing becomes more rapid and readily available, universal testing for COVID-19 may be recommended.

Considerations should be made based on the prevalence of disease on a local level regarding the interpretations of test results due to the risk of false negative results early in the course of disease; patients with unknown COVID-19 status may be considered “positive until proven otherwise” in terms of mobilizing appropriate protective gear for health care workers. Providers in some areas of the world affected early in the global pandemic have advocated for additional imaging evaluation (Computed Tomography (CT) of the Chest) prior to any surgical procedure due to suggestion of superior predictive ability in early disease (2).

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Operating Room Personnel:
The COVID-19 virions are 50-200 nm in size, while N-95 masks are rated to filter, with 95% efficiency, particles that are greater than 300 nm in size(3, 4). There is evidence to suggest that conventional surgical masks may provide a similar level of protection as the N95 mask in general-use conditions(5), and providers should employ the equipment deemed appropriate by their respective institutions.

It is recommended that anyone working in the operating room utilize full PPE, which includes shoe covers, impermeable gowns, surgical or N-95 masks, protective head covering, gloves and eye protection. In addition, movement of personnel in and out of the operating room should be strictly limited, with efforts made to limit staff breaks mid-case when possible. Trainee participation should be limited and include only personnel essential to the safe performance of the operation in order to avoid exposure and preserve PPE resources.

Surgical Approach:
Potential concerns exist regarding aerosolization of viral particles by electrosurgical and ultrasonic device use at the time of surgery, which could then theoretically be transmitted to the operating room environment. Additionally, with laparoscopy or robot-assisted laparoscopy, sudden release of trocar valves, non-air-tight exchange of instruments or specimen extraction via abdominal or vaginal incisions may potentially expose the health care team to aerosolized viral particles. While it is important to acknowledge these concerns, at present, they remain theoretical in relation to risk of transmission of COVID-19 to operating room personnel. There is no available evidence from the COVID-19 pandemic, or from prior global influenza epidemics, to suggest definitively that respiratory viruses are transmitted through an abdominal route from patients to health care providers in the operating room.

Laparoscopic and Robot-assisted Approach to Gynecologic Surgery:
The following are recommendations for best practice when laparoscopy or robot-assisted laparoscopy is performed (Level 3 Evidence based on expert opinion):

  • Employ electrosurgical and ultrasonic devices in a manner that minimizes production of plume, with low power setting and avoidance of long desiccation times
  • When available, make use of a closed smoke evacuation/filtration system with Ultra Low Particulate Air Filtration (ULPA) capability
  • In addition, a laparoscopic suction may be used to remove surgical plume and desufflate the abdominal cavity; do not vent pneumoperitoneum into the room
  • Use low intra-abdominal pressure (10-12mmHg) if feasible
  • Avoid rapid desufflation or loss of pneumoperitoneum, particularly at times of instrument exchange or specimen extraction
  • Tissue extraction should be performed with minimal CO2 escape (desufflate with closed smoke evacuation/filtration system or laparoscopic suction prior to minilaparotomy, making extraction incision, vaginal colpotomy, etc.)
  • Minimize blood/fluid droplet spray or spread
  • Minimize leakage of CO2 from trocars (check seals in reusable trocars or use disposable trocars)

Vaginal and Laparotomic approach to Gynecologic Surgery:
Similar concerns exist in relation to aerosolization of viral particles with use of hand-held electrosurgical devices and plume release directly into the operating room environment in an uncontrolled fashion; these concerns are also unproven in relation to COVID-19 disease transmission. Collaboration with Anesthesiology colleagues and discussion of performing vaginal and open procedures under regional anesthesia is appropriate to avoid the aerosol generating events of intubation and extubation.

Considerations regarding choice of surgical route include patient comorbidities (such as but not limited to: obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) which could result in higher morbidity from laparotomic procedures. Additionally, prolonged hospitalization for recovery after laparotomy could expose patients to higher risk of nosocomial infection including COVID-19, and could place a higher burden on the health-care system.

The following are recommendations for best practice when a vaginal or laparotomic procedure is performed (Level 3 Evidence based on expert opinion):

  • Perform dissection and vascular control using non-electrosurgical techniques where possible
  • Employ electrosurgical and ultrasonic devices in a manner that minimizes production of plume, with low power setting and avoidance of long desiccation times
  • Smoke evacuators should be used alongside ULPA filters where possible
  • Utilize a suction device to remove any surgical plume as it is produced
  • Minimize blood/fluid droplet spray or spread

Hysteroscopic and Other Procedures:
The risk of COVID-19 transmission at time of hysteroscopy with bipolar electrosurgical devices and normal saline as the infusion medium is unknown, but theoretically low. Standard droplet precautions are recommended for PPE. The risks related to laser vaporization and conization procedures are also undelineated, and the above recommendations about minimization and evacuation of surgical plume apply.

Summary and Recommendations:
Surgery for gynecologic patients during the COVID-19 pandemic should be approached on a case-by-case basis, taking into account patient-level factors and local resources. Minimally invasive and vaginal approaches to surgery are associated with lower morbidity for the patient in many cases, as well as shorter hospitalization. The data on risk of surgical plume exposure and transmission of COVID-19 are limited. There are strategies for all surgical approaches that can help mitigate the risk of exposing operating room personnel.

APPENDIX: Symptoms associated with COVID-19 according to WHO and CDC

Common symptoms:

Fever, Dry cough, Fatigue, Shortness of breath

Other associated symptoms:

Muscle aches, Sore throat, Diarrhea, Nausea/vomiting, Runny nose

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus#tab=tab_3

REFERENCES:

  1. AAGL – Elevating Gynecologic Surgery. Joint Society Statement on Elective Surgery during COVID-19 Pandemic. Available at: https://www.aagl.org/news/covid-19-joint-statement-on-elective-surgeries/. Published March 2020. Accessed March 25, 2020.
  2. Ai T, Yang Z, Hou H, Zhan C, et al. Correlation of Chest CT and RT-PCR Testing in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China: A Report of 1014 Cases.Radiology. 2020 Feb 26:200642. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2020200642. [Epub ahead of print]
  3. Chen N, Zhou M. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 99 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China: a descriptive study. Lancet. 2020;395(10223):507–513.
  4. 3M. 3M Infection Prevention N95 Particulate Respirators, 1860/1860S and 1870. Frequently asked questions. Available at: http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/323208O/n95-particulate-respirators-1860-1860s-1870-faqs.pdf. Published 2008. Accessed March 25, 2020.
  5. Radonovich LJ, Simberkoff MS, Bessesen MT, et al. N95 Respirators vs Medical Masks for Preventing Influenza Among Health Care Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2019;322(9):824–833. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.11645

Declaración Conjunta de Sociedades sobre Cirugía Ginecológica Mínimamente Invasiva durante la Pandemia COVID-19

Emitdo:  3/27/2020 por AAGL

La atención quirúrgica de los pacientes ginecológicos durante la pandemia de COVID-19 presenta numerosos desafíos no solo con respecto a la seguridad del paciente y la comunidad, sino también la de los médicos y el personal de quirófano. La orientación sobre la cirugía ginecológica mínimamente invasiva (laparoscópica o robot-asistida) es un tema en rápida evolución.

La información presentada a continuación está sujeta a cambios a medida que se disponga de nuevos datos.

Urgencia del tratamiento Quirúrgico:

La AAGL, junto con muchas otras sociedades quirúrgicas de profesionales de la salud de la mujer, apoya la suspensión de la atención quirúrgica no esencial  (Cirugías Electivas) durante las fases iniciales  de la pandemia de COVID-19. Consultar la declaración conjunta de la AAGL sobre cirugías electivas con fecha 16 de marzo de 2020 (2).

Además, dependiendo del grado de urgencia, los pacientes positivos para COVID-19 pueden ser mejor tratados retrasando los procedimientos quirúrgicos hasta que se resuelva su infección. Sin embargo, en algunos casos, cirugía  ginecológica puede considerarse esencial y no puede retrasarse. Hemos esbozado información importante de seguridad a tener en cuenta al realizar una cirugía ginecológica durante este periodo.

Evaluación Universal:

El status de COVID-19 de cada paciente debe evaluarse mediante un examen preoperatorio el día de la cirugía, incluidos los antecedentes, el examen físico y el cuestionario del paciente sobre los síntomas relacionados con la virosis (ver Apéndice 1) y las posibles exposiciones. Cuando sea posible, se deben realizar las pruebas de laboratorio para COVID-19 para pacientes sintomáticos y en riesgo antes de la cirugía. A medida que las pruebas de laboratorio para COVID-19 se vuelven más rápidas y disponibles, se podría recomendar realizarla preoperatoria en forma sistemática a todas las pacientes.

Debemos considerar basados en la prevalencia de la enfermedad a nivel local, la interpretación de los resultados de las pruebas de laboratorio debido al riesgo de  falsos negativos al inicio de la enfermedad, los pacientes con un estado desconocido de COVID-19 pueden considerarse “positivos hasta que se demuestre lo contrario” en términos de utilizar el equipo de protección adecuado para los trabajadores de la salud. Especialistas en algunas áreas del mundo afectadas por la pandemia global han sugerido una evaluación adicional por imágenes (tomografía computarizada (TC) del tórax) antes de cualquier procedimiento quirúrgico debido a la posible capacidad predictiva superior en enfermedad temprana (1).

Equipo de Protección Personal (EPP) para Personal de Quirófano:

Los viriones del COVID-19 tienen un tamaño de 50-200 nm, mientras que las máscaras N-95 están clasificadas para filtrar, con una eficiencia del 95%, las partículas que tienen un tamaño superior a 300 nm (3, 4). Hay evidencia que sugiere que las máscaras quirúrgicas convencionales pueden proporcionar un nivel de protección similar al de la máscara N95 (5). y los efectores de salud deben emplear el equipo que sus respectivas instituciones consideren apropiado.

Se recomienda que cualquier persona que trabaje en el quirófano utilice EPP completo, que incluye cubiertas para zapatos, batas impermeables, máscaras quirúrgicas o N-95, protectores para la cabeza, guantes y protección para los ojos. Además, el movimiento de personal dentro y fuera de la sala de operaciones debe ser estrictamente limitado, con esfuerzos para limitar los descansos del personal a mitad de caso cuando sea posible. La participación de los aprendices o  médicos rotantes limitado e incluye solo personal esencial para el desempeño seguro de la operación para evitar la exposición y preservar los recursos de EPP.

Enfoque Quirúrgico:

Existen preocupaciones potenciales con respecto a la aerosolización de partículas virales mediante el uso de dispositivos electroquirúrgicos y ultrasónicos en el momento de la cirugía, que en teoría podrían transmitirse al entorno de la sala de operaciones. Además, con la laparoscopia o laparoscopia asistida por robot, la liberación repentina de las válvulas de trocar, el intercambio no hermético de instrumentos o la extracción de muestras a través de incisiones abdominales o vaginales pueden exponer al equipo de atención médica a partículas virales en aerosol. Si bien es importante reconocer estas preocupaciones, en la actualidad, siguen siendo teóricas en relación al riesgo de transmisión de COVID-19 al personal de la sala de operaciones. No hay evidencia disponible de la pandemia de COVID-19, o de epidemias mundiales de influenza anteriores, que sugiera definitivamente que los virus respiratorios se transmiten a través de una ruta abdominal de los pacientes a los proveedores de atención médica en el quirófano.

Abordaje Laparoscópico o Laparoscópico Asistido por Robot en Cirugía Ginecológica:

Las siguientes son recomendaciones para la mejor práctica cuando se realiza la laparoscopía o la laparoscopia asistida por robot(evidencia de Nivel 3 basada en la opinión de expertos):

  • Emplee dispositivos electroquirúrgicos y ultrasónicos de una manera que minimice la producción de humo quirurgico, con una configuración de baja potencia, evacuadores de humo incorporados y evitando largos tiempos de desecación.
  • Utilice succión laparoscópica para eliminar el humo quirúrgico y desinflar la cavidad abdominal; no ventile el neumoperitoneo en la habitación
  • Cuando esté disponible, utilice un sistema de evaluación / filtración de humo con capacidad de filtración ultra baja de partículas de aire (FUBP)
  • Use presión intraabdominal baja (10-12 mmHg) si es posible
  • Evite la desuflación rápida o la pérdida de neumoperitoneo, particularmente en momentos de intercambio de instrumentos o extracción de muestras.
  • La extracción del tejido debe realizarse con un escape mínimo de CO2 (desinflar con succión laparoscópica antes de la minilaparotomía, realizar incisión de extracción, colpotomía vaginal, etc.)
  • Minimice el spray y diseminación de gotas de sangre / fluidos
  • Minimice las fugas de CO2 de los trócares (revise las valvulas en los trócares reutilizables o use trócares desechables

Abordaje Vaginal y Laparotómico de la Cirugía Ginecológica:

Existen inquietudes similares en relación con la aerosolización de partículas virales con el uso de dispositivos electroquirúrgicos de mano y el humo liberado directamente en el entorno de la sala de operaciones de manera incontrolada; Estas preocupaciones tampoco están probadas en relación con la transmisión de la enfermedad COVID-19. La colaboración con colegas de anestesiología y la discusión sobre la realización de procedimientos vaginales y abiertos bajo anestesia regional es apropiada para evitar los eventos de intubación y extubación que generan aerosoles.

Las consideraciones con respecto a la elección de la ruta quirúrgica incluyen comorbilidades del paciente (tales como, entre otras: obesidad, diabetes, enfermedades cardiovasculares) que podrían provocar una mayor morbilidad por los procedimientos laparotómicos. Además, la hospitalización prolongada para la recuperación después de la laparotomía podría exponer a los pacientes a un mayor riesgo de infección nosocomial, incluido COVID-19, y podría suponer una carga mayor para el sistema de atención médica.

Las siguientes son recomendaciones para la mejor práctica cuando se realiza un procedimiento vaginal o laparotómico (evidencia de nivel 3 basada en la opinión de expertos):

  • Realizar disección y control vascular utilizando técnicas no electroquirúrgicas siempre que sea posible.
  • Emplee dispositivos electroquirúrgicos y ultrasónicos de una manera que minimice la producción de humo quirúrgico , con un ajuste de baja potencia y evitando largos tiempos de desecación.
  • Cuando sea posible deben usarse extractores de humo junto con los filtros ULPA
  • Utilice un dispositivo de succión para eliminar cualquier penacho quirúrgico a medida que se produce
  • Minimice el spray o la diseminación de gotas de sangre y fluidos

Procedimientos Histeroscópicos y de Otro Tipo:

Se desconoce el riesgo de transmisión de COVID-19 en el momento de la histeroscopia con dispositivos electroquirúrgicos bipolares  y solución salina normal como medio de infusión, pero en teoría es bajo. Se recomiendan precauciones  estándar como el uso de  EPP. Los riesgos relacionados con la vaporización con láser y los procedimientos de conización tampoco están definidos, y se aplican las recomendaciones anteriores sobre minimización y evacuación del humo quirúrgico.

Resumen y Recomendaciones:

La cirugía para pacientes ginecológicas durante la pandemia de COVID-19 debe abordarse caso por caso, teniendo en cuenta los factores del paciente y de los recursos locales. El abordaje quirúrgico  laparoscópico y vaginal se asocia con una menor morbilidad para el paciente en muchos casos, así como con una hospitalización más corta. Los datos sobre el riesgo de exposición quirúrgica y la transmisión de COVID-19 son limitados. Existen estrategias para todos los procedimientos quirúrgicos que pueden ayudar a mitigar el riesgo de exponer al personal de la sala de operaciones

APÉNDICE: Síntomas asociados con COVID-19 según la OMS y los CDC

Síntomas comunes:

Fiebre, Tos seca, Fatiga, Falta de aliento

Otros síntomas asociados:

Dolores musculares, Dolor de garganta, Diarrea, Náuseas vómitos, Rinorrea

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus#tab=tab_3

REFERENCES:

    1. AAGL – Elevating Gynecologic Surgery. Joint Society Statement on Elective Surgery during COVID-19 Pandemic. Available at: https://www.aagl.org/news/covid-19-joint-statement-on-elective-surgeries/. Published March 2020. Accessed March 25, 2020.
    2. Ai T, Yang Z, Hou H, Zhan C, et al. Correlation of Chest CT and RT-PCR Testing in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China: A Report of 1014 Cases.Radiology. 2020 Feb 26:200642. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2020200642. [Epub ahead of print]
    3. Chen N, Zhou M. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 99 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China: a descriptive study. Lancet. 2020;395(10223):507–513.
    4. 3M. 3M Infection Prevention N95 Particulate Respirators, 1860/1860S and 1870. Frequently asked questions. Available at: http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/323208O/n95-particulate-respirators-1860-1860s-1870-faqs.pdf. Published 2008. Accessed March 25, 2020.
    5. Radonovich LJ, Simberkoff MS, Bessesen MT, et al. N95 Respirators vs Medical Masks for Preventing Influenza Among Health Care Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2019;322(9):824–833. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.11645

Declaração conjunta sobre cirurgia ginecológica minimamente invasiva durante a pandemia de COVID-19

3/30/2020 AAGL

O tratamento cirúrgico de pacientes ginecológicos durante a pandemia de COVID-19 apresenta inúmeros desafios, não apenas com relação à segurança do paciente e da comunidade, mas também dos médicos e da equipe de enfermagem da sala cirúrgica. As orientações sobre cirurgia ginecológica minimamente invasiva são um tópico em rápida evolução e as informações apresentadas abaixo estão sujeitas a alterações à medida que novos dados se tornem disponíveis.

Urgência do tratamento cirúrgico: A AAGL, juntamente com muitas outras sociedades de saúde da mulher, apóia a suspensão de cuidados cirúrgicos não essenciais durante as fases imediatas da pandemia de COVID-19. Isto pode ser checado na declaração da AAGL sobre cirurgias eletivas datada de 16 de março de 2020 (1). Além disso, dependendo do grau de urgência, as pacientes positivas para COVID-19 podem ser melhor atendidas ao retardarmos os procedimentos cirúrgicos até que a infecção seja resolvida. No entanto, em alguns casos, o atendimento cirúrgico ginecológico pode ser considerado essencial e impossível de ser adiado. Descrevemos abaixo informações importantes sobre segurança a serem consideradas ao realizar uma cirurgia ginecológica durante esse período:

Avaliação universal:

A avaliação da infecção pelo COVID-19 de cada paciente deve ser feita por meio de triagem pré-operatória no dia da cirurgia, incluindo história, exame físico e questionário do paciente sobre sintomas relacionados à gripe (consulte o Apêndice 1), e sobre possível contato com portadores do vírus. Quando possível, o teste para detecção do COVID-19 deve ser realizado em pacientes sintomáticas e de risco antes da cirurgia. O teste deve ser recomendado de modo universal à medida que se torne mais rápido e mais facilmente disponível. Os riscos de resultados falso-negativos decorrentes do tempo suficiente para a positivação do exame devem ser pormenorizados. Pacientes com status do COVID-19 desconhecido devem ser consideradas “positivas até que se prove em contrário” em termos de mobilização de equipamentos de proteção adequados para os profissionais de saúde. Especialistas em algumas áreas do mundo afetadas no início da pandemia global preconizaram avaliações adicionais por imagem (Tomografia Computadorizada (TC) do tórax), antes de qualquer procedimento cirúrgico devido à possibilidade de detecção precoce da doença através deste exame (2).

Equipamento de proteção individual (EPI) para a equipe cirúrgica:

O tamanho estimado do vírion do COVID-19 é de 50-200 nm. As máscaras N-95 são capazes de filtrar com eficiência 95%, partículas com tamanho superior a 300 nm (3, 4). Existem evidências que sugerem que as máscaras cirúrgicas convencionais podem fornecer um nível de proteção semelhante ao da máscara N95 em condições de uso geral (5) e os fornecedores devem empregar o equipamento considerado apropriado por suas respectivas instituições.

Recomenda-se que qualquer pessoa que trabalhe na sala de cirurgia utilize EPI completos, que inclui propés, aventais impermeáveis, máscaras cirúrgicas ou máscaras N-95, proteção para a cabeça, luvas e proteção para os olhos. Além disso, a movimentação de pessoal para dentro e fora da sala cirúrgica deve ser limitada, com esforços para limitar as pausas de trabalho, quando possível. A participação do profissional em treinamento deve ser limitada; devem estar na sala cirúrgica apenas o pessoal essencial para o desempenho seguro da cirurgia, a fim de evitar a exposição desnecessária e de preservar disponibilidade de EPI.

Abordagem cirúrgica

Existem preocupações em potencial em relação à aerossolização de partículas virais pelo uso de dispositivos de energia (eletrocirúrgicos e ultrassônicos), no momento da cirurgia, que teoricamente poderiam ser transmitidas ao ambiente da sala de operações. Além disso, com laparoscopia ou laparoscopia assistida por robô, liberação abrupta de válvulas de trocartes, troca de instrumentos ou extração de tecidos por incisões abdominais ou vaginais podem expor a equipe de saúde a partículas virais em aerossol. Todavia, não há ainda evidências suficientes para comprovar estas preocupações em relação ao risco de transmissão do COVID-19 ao pessoal da sala cirúrgica.

Abordagem laparoscópica e robô assistida para cirurgia ginecológica:

A seguir, são apresentadas recomendações de melhores práticas quando a laparoscopia ou laparoscopia robô assistida são realizadas (evidência de nível 3 com base na opinião de especialistas):

  • Empregue dispositivos eletrocirúrgicos e ultrassônicos de maneira a minimizar a produção de fumaça, com baixa potência e evitar dissecções demoradas;
  • Sempre que disponível, use um sistema fechado de evacuação / filtragem de gases com capacidade de retenção de partículas pequenas / ultrapequenas;
  • Utilizar o aspirador laparoscópico para remover os gases cirúrgicos, em sistema fechado, antes de desinsuflar a cavidade abdominal; não esvaziar o pneumoperitônio a céu aberto;
  • Usar baixa pressão intra-abdominal (10-12 mmHg), se possível;
  • Evitar rápida desinssuflação ou perda de pneumoperitônio, particularmente em momentos de troca de instrumentos ou extração de amostras;
  • A extração de tecidos deve ser realizada com escape mínimo de CO2 (desinssuflar com sistema fechado de evacuação / filtragem de fumaça ou sucção laparoscópica antes da realização de minilaparotomias, e antes da colpotomia vaginal);
  • Minimizar a pulverização ou propagação de gotículas de sangue / fluidos;
  • Minimizar o vazamento de CO2 nos trocarteres (verificar as vedações nos trocateres reutilizáveis ou priorizar uso de trocarteres descartáveis)

Abordagem vaginal e laparotômica em cirurgia ginecológica:

Preocupações semelhantes existem em relação à aerossolização de partículas virais com o uso de dispositivos eletrocirúrgicos e a liberação de fumaça diretamente no ambiente da sala cirúrgica de maneira descontrolada; essas preocupações também não foram comprovadas em relação à transmissão da doença por COVID-19. É importante a colaboração com equipe de anestesiologistas quanto à realização de procedimentos por via vaginal e/ou abertos sob anestesia regional, evitando geração de aerossóis nos momentos de intubação e extubação.

Considerações sobre a escolha da via cirúrgica incluem comorbidades da paciente (tais como obesidade, diabetes, doença cardiovascular e outros), que podem resultar em maior morbidade por procedimentos abertos (laparotomias). Além disso, a hospitalização prolongada para recuperação após a laparotomia pode expor as pacientes a um maior risco de infecção hospitalar, incluindo COVID-19, com sobrecarga do sistema de saúde.

A seguir, são apresentadas recomendações de melhores práticas quando um procedimento vaginal ou por laparotomia é realizado (evidência de nível 3 com base na opinião de especialistas):

  • Realizar dissecção e controle de sangramento usando-se técnicas não eletrocirúrgicas sempre que possível;
  • Empregar dispositivos eletrocirúrgicos e ultrassônicos de maneira a minimizar a produção de fumaça, com configuração de baixa potência e evitar longos tempos de dissecção;
  • Usar evacuadores de fumaça com elemento filtrante para absorção de pequenas partículas sempre que possível;
  • Utilizar um aspirador para remover fumaça cirúrgica à medida que é produzida;
  • Minimizar a pulverização ou propagação de gotículas de sangue / fluidos.

Procedimentos histeroscópicos e outros procedimentos

O risco de transmissão do COVID-19 no momento da histeroscopia com dispositivos eletrocirúrgicos bipolares e solução salina normal como meio de infusão é desconhecido, mas teoricamente é baixo. As recomendações para uso de EPI seguem o que já foi exposto anteiormente. Os riscos relacionados aos procedimentos de vaporização e conização a laser também não são conhecidos, e as recomendações acima sobre minimização e aspiração da fumaça cirúrgica também se aplicam a estes procedimentos.

Resumo e Recomendações

A cirurgia para pacientes ginecológicos durante a pandemia de COVID-19 deve ser avaliada caso a caso, levando-se em consideração fatores de risco e comorbidades das pacientes e os recursos locais. Abordagens minimamente invasivas e vaginais estão associadas a menor morbidade para o paciente em muitos casos, além de menor hospitalização. Os dados sobre o risco de exposição à fumaça cirúrgica e à transmissão do COVID-19 são limitados. Existem estratégias para todas as abordagens cirúrgicas que podem ajudar a mitigar o risco de expor as equipes em sala cirúrgica.

APÊNDICE:

Sintomas associados ao COVID-19 de acordo com a OMS e CDC

Sintomas comuns:

Febre

Tosse seca

Fadiga

Falta de ar

Outros sintomas associados: Dores musculares Dor de garganta Diarréia

Náusea / vômito, Nariz escorrendo

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus#tab=tab_3

Referencias Bibligráficas

    1. AAGL – Elevating Gynecologic Surgery. Joint Society Statement on Elective Surgery during COVID-19 Pandemic. Available at:
      https://www.aagl.org/news/covid-19-joint-statement-on-elective-surgeries/.
      Published March 2020. Accessed March 25, 2020.
    2. Ai T, Yang Z, Hou H, Zhan C, et al. Correlation of Chest CT and RT-PCR Testing in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China: A Report of 1014 Cases.Radiology. 2020 Feb 26:200642. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2020200642. [Epub ahead of print]
    3. Chen N, Zhou M. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 99 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China: a descriptive study. Lancet. 2020;395(10223):507–513.
    4. 3M. 3M Infection Prevention N95 Particulate Respirators, 1860/1860S and 1870.
      Frequently asked questions. Available at:
      http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/323208O/n95-particulate-respirators-1860-1860s-1870-faqs.pdf. Published 2008. Accessed March 25, 2020.
    5. Radonovich LJ, Simberkoff MS, Bessesen MT, et al. N95 Respirators vs Medical Masks for Preventing Influenza Among Health Care Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2019;322(9):824–833. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.11645

Filed under "COVID-19, News, Press Releases/Statements".

AAGL – Elevating Gynecologic Surgery
6757 Katella Avenue | Cypress, CA 90630
(800) 554-2245 | (714) 503-6200
  
 
By using AAGL.org, you agree that you've read and accept our Privacy Policy.
css.php Healthcare Marketing Agency